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The other Oviedo. And more on the real Oviedo, and Málaga's "origins" (25th June, 2017)

In the 2006-07 Segunda B season, Real Oviedo were relegated to the Tercera - the fourth tier of Spanish football. Predictably so - three different managers (José Antonio Velázquez, Ramiro Solís, Ismael Díaz) took over that season, the squad's top goalscorer, Jon Carrera, had a tally of four goals, and the team didn't win a single game away from home.

As it turns out, the turmoil wasn't contained on the pitch - in 2006 Alberto González took a controlling share in the club. He did not pay social security or tax to the inland revenue and then disappeared - perhaps Cuba, possibly Panama - and is now wanted on two counts of fraud.

But there was another Oviedo team that was relegated from the Segunda B that year too.

AD Universidad de Oviedo, the team that represents the University of Oviedo, also went down in only their fourth year in the Segunda B.

They have never come back up, and seven consecutive top 10 finishes were followed by a disastrous 2014-15 Tercera campaign, which meant demotion to the regional fifth tier. And they're not even doing well there, with 15th and 12th place finishes - the future isn't exactly exciting...




That relegation meant that every player at Real Oviedo left. Even Michu left for second-tier Celta Vigo - the player who arguably most embodies Real Oviedo and would later on reject a shot at top flight football later on because that opportunity was offered by bitter rivals Sporting Gijón. Nevertheless, his story ended with a move to top-flight Rayo Vallecano, a bargain sale to Swansea, and a string of injuries that led him to the fourth tier of Spanish football and back to Real Oviedo.



Málaga had a reserve club, founded on May 25, 1948 when CD Málaga took over a junior club, CD Santo Tomás, with the purpose of establishing a reserve team. The club was renamed Club Atlético Malagueño, reviving the name of one of the two clubs that had merged to form CD Málaga in 1933.

During the 1959-60 season CA Malagueño and CD Málaga found themselves together in the third level. As a reserve team, the former should have been relegated. To avoid this, they separated from their parent club and registered as an independent club with the Royal Spanish Football Federation.

In 1992 when CD Málaga dissolved after financial difficulties, CA Malagueño continued playing. The 1992-93 season saw them playing in Tercera Division Group 9. After a successful campaign, the club was promoted to Segunda División B. However, the following season the club was relegated again and, facing financial difficulties, also seriously faced closure.

On December 19, 1993, in a referendum, the club’s members voted in favor of changing names and, on June 29, 1994 CA Malagueño changed their name to Málaga Club de Fútbol S.A.D., becoming from then an official succession to what was previously called Club Deportivo Málaga.




I'm sorry you have to read that pun in the title - it just had to be done :)




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