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More on CD Móstoles URJC. Your cab driver could be a footballer! And on Girona buying youth teams (18th June, 2017)

A couple of days ago, I wrote about CD Móstoles URJC, and how Rayo B coach Juanvi Peinado will be coaching them next season (read it here).

I dug deeper, and found some stories that were worth sharing.

This is part 2.




CD Móstoles URJC came fourth in the Tercera this season, qualifying for the promotion playoffs. Their top scorer, and the third top scorer in the league, was Gerardo Berodia, with 17 goals.

He is another player who made their debut in professional football late in his career - at the age of 31.

Born in Madrid, Berodia joined Real Madrid in 1991 at age 10. He left seven years later and, until the age of 31, competed solely in lower league and amateur football, representing El Álamo, Santa Ana, Alcalá, Pinto, San Sebastián de los Reyes, Navalcarnero, Leganés, Zamora, Ponferradina, Conquense and Lugo.

He helped Lugo in the 2011–12 season to promotion to the Segunda, scoring seven goals.

However, 33 professional minutes of game time spanning four games led him to leave in January 2013, joining several compatriots at Club Jorge Wilstermann in the Bolivian League.

Berodia scored 14 goals in his only full campaign, notably helping his team finish fourth in the Apertura and becoming a Bolivian idol. However, his son had a serious accident - his hands, arms and legs were cut whilst getting out of a pool with a glass door and the doctors had to perform 600 stitches.

As his son underwent rehab in Madrid, Berodia chose to renounce his status in Bolivia and return to Spain in the middle of 2014. Unemployed, Berodia bought a taxicab to provide for his family. He continued his job whilst an active player, signing for former side Navalcarnero.

In the summer of 2016, he joined Móstoles, continuing the form that led him to score 23 goals in his final season at Navalcarnero to help them to promotion.

Just a few days ago, he signed for Rayo Majadahonda in the Segunda B.





On 10 January 2016, during a Tercera División fixture at CU Collado Villalba, Berodia netted seven times in a final 12–1 routing, as the opposition fielded only youth players in protest against the board of directors.



As I said before, CD Móstoles URJC came fourth in the Tercera this season, qualifying for the promotion playoffs. They were eliminated by CF Peralada.

Most youth teams are quite close to their parent clubs, or at least reside in the same city. Rayo B's stadium (Ciudad Deportiva Rayo Vallecano) exists in Villa de Vallecas while the main stadium (Campo de Fútbol de Vallecas) resides in Puente de Vallecas - a distance of just 12 km.

In contrast, newly-promoted Girona's youth team lies in a different city - Peralada is over 45 km away from Girona.

In 2016, Girona were with a B team that had never left the the fifth tier - albeit had produced players such as Gerard Gumbau, David Juncà, Sebastián Coris and Pere Pons - and a need to attract young players - especially from Manchester City.

Girona B became the "C-team", and fourth tier club Peralada became the official reserve team.

This isn't the first time Girona have done this either. In 2011, CF Riudellots were promoted to the sixth tier for the first time in their history, and Girona bought them to become a reserve team. The club was dissolved in the following year, with Girona B taking its place in the sixth tier in 2012.

Girona B were promoted to the fifth tier in their first season, and have languished there ever since.

If that's too confusing, spare a thought about David Juncà. He joined Girona's youth teams in 2010, after starting out at Figueres, Barcelona and Mallorca. He played for Riudellots in 2011-12, Girona B in 2012-13, and for Girona's first team between 2011-15.

He is now at La Liga side Eibar.

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