Skip to main content

Marca out-factchecking me. Carlos Aranda - Two UCL titles, eight La Liga clubs, and unemployment. (1st June 2017)

I would like to start with an apology.

On two different occasions on this blog (here and here), I mentioned something to this effect:

"Jordi Gómez, Cristaldo, Gazzaniga, Tomás Mejías and Pablo Iñiguez will return to their parent clubs, and Miku, Baena, Ebert, Embarba, Lass Bangoura, Quini, Nacho, Raț, Manucho, Amaya, Aguirre, Dorado, Dovale and Toño are all out of contract.

Basically, unless there are any contract extensions, we have no goalkeepers, a center-back (Zé Castro), a left-back (Johan Mojica), a right-back (Ernesto Galán), two central midfielders (Fran Beltrán and Roberto Trashorras), an attacking midfielder (Santi Comesaña), a left winger (Álex Moreno) and a striker (Javi Guerra)."


I naively used transfermarkt.com in writing that - never doing that again.

Marca recently came up with a list of contracts expiring at the end of the season, and it reads more like this:

"Cristaldo, Gazzaniga, Tomás Mejías and Pablo Iñiguez will return to their parent clubs, and Miku, Baena, Ebert, Quini, Nacho, Manucho, Jordi Gómez, Dorado and Dovale are all out of contract.

Basically, unless there are any contract extensions, we have a goalkeeper who hasn't played for a year (Toño), two center-backs (Zé Castro, Amaya), two left-backs (Johan Mojica* and
Raț), a right-back (Ernesto Galán), two central midfielders (Fran Beltrán and Roberto Trashorras), an attacking midfielder (Santi Comesaña), four wingers (Embarba, Lass, Aguirre and Álex Moreno) and a striker (Javi Guerra)."

*Returning from loan. Also, Marca never mentioned him, but he did sign a four-year deal on joining the club in 2014.

That's thirteen players out of a current squad of 26 will leave, and thirteen, along with Mojica, are certain to have a contract for next season.


So I apologise for that - and I'll make sure I check my sources from now on. Like *gulp* Marca. I've also added correction notices on the current blog posts so that there is no confusion.



On November 5, 2016, a player who hadn't played for over a year joined his first ever club - a Tercera outfit called El Palo. Obviously, this was an ordinary signing.

But the player El Palo signed was no ordinary player.

Carlos Aranda was born in Málaga, Andalusia. He trained with El Palo before being snapped up by Real Madrid, from where he graduated. He never appeared in any La Liga matches with the first team; however, he played a small part in two UEFA Champions League-winning squads, appearing against Molde FK (1999–2000) and FC Lokomotiv Moscow (2001–02).

In January 2002, Aranda moved to Numancia, being instrumental in helping the Soria club barely retain its second division status. This prompted a move at the end of the season to Villarreal on a five-year deal but, as opportunities were scarce, he returned to Numancia in January 2003.

Aranda joined Sevilla in 2004–05, scoring in his UEFA Cup debut, a 2–0 home win over Alemannia Aachen on 4 November 2004. He was relatively used during the campaign, but was deemed surplus to requirements after the arrivals of Luís Fabiano, Frédéric Kanouté and Javier Saviola, and left for Albacete Balompié on loan – he had already represented the Castile-La Mancha team in the 2003–04 season.

Aranda's second spell with Albacete finished on a sour note, as he was accused of unprofessional behaviour by the club. He responded claiming he had been forced to appear at a press conference to show repentance for his actions.

After being instrumental in Real Murcia's return to the top flight in 2007 by netting 11 goals, squad second-best behind Iván Alonso, Aranda had an unassuming spell with Granada 74 CF. After spending the first months of 2008–09 training with lowly CF Gavà, he signed in December 2008 with Numancia for a third stint, appearing and scoring regularly but eventually suffering first division relegation.

On 16 July 2009, Aranda moved to Osasuna as part of a deal that saw Enrique Sola move in the opposite direction, on loan for a season. In his second year with the Navarrese, he scored four times but also struggled with injuries and loss of form, and Sola also returned to the team's setup, eventually finishing as top scorer.

In July 2011, aged 31, Aranda signed for Levante. In January of the following year, after having received very little playing time, he switched to fellow league side Real Zaragoza; on 25 February 2012, he put the visitors ahead at hometown's Málaga, who eventually won it 5–1.

Aranda switched clubs again in the winter transfer window of 2013, signing for his eighth in La Liga (nine if you count Real Madrid), Granada, the most for any player.

He went on to play for Las Palmas and Numancia in the Segunda, but was released by the latter club in February 2015.

Over a year of unemployment later, Carlos Aranda is back where he started.

His local team, El Palo.




Comments

Popular posts from this blog

From Catalonia to Heybridge - the story of an eighth division club (19th October, 2017)

After spending his whole life at UDA Gramenet and a season at Europa, Guillem Ramón moved to Terrassa in the summer of 2014. It was just another Catalan player transferring between two clubs in the Catalan regional leagues - nothing extraordinary.

But it was consequential.

In March 2015, in a match against Sabadell, the full back suffered a complete meniscal rupture, and his season was over. So was his contract - and a big chunk of the 2015-16 season as well. He ended up signing for Cerdanyola, without pay (as he was recuperating), and the doctors said that January would be his return time. However, he debuted in November.

In hindsight, it was a mistake.

After two games, in a training session, on November 25th he got injured again - this time in the quadriceps in the same leg. After two months of recuperation, and still no guarantee of pay, Guillem left for new pastures in February 2016. A trial at Coplestonians FC followed; so did an opportunity at Needham Market FC, in the seventh t…

Non-league Incider: Dulwich Hamlet 2-1 East Thurrock United

When I was more young and foolish I made a promise to myself that I wouldn't visit a football stadium until I visited Vallekas. Frustrated by my inability to plan a trip, I broke that promise by watching a game in the sixth tier of English football.

This is that game. This is my story.

If I've learnt anything, it's this: never make promises to yourself. Promises to yourself are like bonds to an imaginary world - they're not attached to anything. Instead, they only serve to frustrate you, and sometimes those around you.

In 2016, I remember being outside Wembley and not going inside for a stadium tour. In 2014, I remember giving up the opportunity to watch Real Madrid play AC Milan in Dubai. For a year the stadiums of Chelsea and Fulham were on the same street as mine. For three years, every time my friend said he was going to watch Leyton Orient, every time my brother talked about his love for Arsenal, every time I looked at a map of London and saw how close I was to the …

Fuenlabrada - the mighty challengers: Part 2; aka Juan Quero - the roller-coaster (15th October, 2017)

In just a few months, Fuenlabrada have competed for promotion to the Segunda, signed a center-back from a La Liga side, and will now be playing Real Madrid in the Copa del Rey.

This is part 2 of a series about Fuenlabrada, the mighty challengers to Real Madrid, who they play in the cup on the 26th of October.

You can read part 1 here.



He was short. Very short. At 5'3", the left winger sometimes played in an over-sized shirt.

The ball never left his feet. His feet were tiny but they had magic. A dizzying array of body feints, close control, direction changes and sheer speed, often resembling a roller-coaster, left opposition defenders outwitted. And yes - sometimes, he frustrated. Sometimes, he was irregular.

But when he turned up, the world was at his feet.

If Juan Quero plays against Real Madrid he'll be playing against the club that let him go. The club that didn't think he had it in him to become a La Liga player.

The club that was wrong. Very, very wrong - he went fr…