Skip to main content

Marca out-factchecking me. Carlos Aranda - Two UCL titles, eight La Liga clubs, and unemployment. (1st June 2017)

I would like to start with an apology.

On two different occasions on this blog (here and here), I mentioned something to this effect:

"Jordi Gómez, Cristaldo, Gazzaniga, Tomás Mejías and Pablo Iñiguez will return to their parent clubs, and Miku, Baena, Ebert, Embarba, Lass Bangoura, Quini, Nacho, Raț, Manucho, Amaya, Aguirre, Dorado, Dovale and Toño are all out of contract.

Basically, unless there are any contract extensions, we have no goalkeepers, a center-back (Zé Castro), a left-back (Johan Mojica), a right-back (Ernesto Galán), two central midfielders (Fran Beltrán and Roberto Trashorras), an attacking midfielder (Santi Comesaña), a left winger (Álex Moreno) and a striker (Javi Guerra)."


I naively used transfermarkt.com in writing that - never doing that again.

Marca recently came up with a list of contracts expiring at the end of the season, and it reads more like this:

"Cristaldo, Gazzaniga, Tomás Mejías and Pablo Iñiguez will return to their parent clubs, and Miku, Baena, Ebert, Quini, Nacho, Manucho, Jordi Gómez, Dorado and Dovale are all out of contract.

Basically, unless there are any contract extensions, we have a goalkeeper who hasn't played for a year (Toño), two center-backs (Zé Castro, Amaya), two left-backs (Johan Mojica* and
Raț), a right-back (Ernesto Galán), two central midfielders (Fran Beltrán and Roberto Trashorras), an attacking midfielder (Santi Comesaña), four wingers (Embarba, Lass, Aguirre and Álex Moreno) and a striker (Javi Guerra)."

*Returning from loan. Also, Marca never mentioned him, but he did sign a four-year deal on joining the club in 2014.

That's thirteen players out of a current squad of 26 will leave, and thirteen, along with Mojica, are certain to have a contract for next season.


So I apologise for that - and I'll make sure I check my sources from now on. Like *gulp* Marca. I've also added correction notices on the current blog posts so that there is no confusion.



On November 5, 2016, a player who hadn't played for over a year joined his first ever club - a Tercera outfit called El Palo. Obviously, this was an ordinary signing.

But the player El Palo signed was no ordinary player.

Carlos Aranda was born in Málaga, Andalusia. He trained with El Palo before being snapped up by Real Madrid, from where he graduated. He never appeared in any La Liga matches with the first team; however, he played a small part in two UEFA Champions League-winning squads, appearing against Molde FK (1999–2000) and FC Lokomotiv Moscow (2001–02).

In January 2002, Aranda moved to Numancia, being instrumental in helping the Soria club barely retain its second division status. This prompted a move at the end of the season to Villarreal on a five-year deal but, as opportunities were scarce, he returned to Numancia in January 2003.

Aranda joined Sevilla in 2004–05, scoring in his UEFA Cup debut, a 2–0 home win over Alemannia Aachen on 4 November 2004. He was relatively used during the campaign, but was deemed surplus to requirements after the arrivals of Luís Fabiano, Frédéric Kanouté and Javier Saviola, and left for Albacete Balompié on loan – he had already represented the Castile-La Mancha team in the 2003–04 season.

Aranda's second spell with Albacete finished on a sour note, as he was accused of unprofessional behaviour by the club. He responded claiming he had been forced to appear at a press conference to show repentance for his actions.

After being instrumental in Real Murcia's return to the top flight in 2007 by netting 11 goals, squad second-best behind Iván Alonso, Aranda had an unassuming spell with Granada 74 CF. After spending the first months of 2008–09 training with lowly CF Gavà, he signed in December 2008 with Numancia for a third stint, appearing and scoring regularly but eventually suffering first division relegation.

On 16 July 2009, Aranda moved to Osasuna as part of a deal that saw Enrique Sola move in the opposite direction, on loan for a season. In his second year with the Navarrese, he scored four times but also struggled with injuries and loss of form, and Sola also returned to the team's setup, eventually finishing as top scorer.

In July 2011, aged 31, Aranda signed for Levante. In January of the following year, after having received very little playing time, he switched to fellow league side Real Zaragoza; on 25 February 2012, he put the visitors ahead at hometown's Málaga, who eventually won it 5–1.

Aranda switched clubs again in the winter transfer window of 2013, signing for his eighth in La Liga (nine if you count Real Madrid), Granada, the most for any player.

He went on to play for Las Palmas and Numancia in the Segunda, but was released by the latter club in February 2015.

Over a year of unemployment later, Carlos Aranda is back where he started.

His local team, El Palo.




Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Non-league Incider: Cray Valley Paper Mills 4-4 Punjab United Gravesend

Last game: 9th August: St Helens Town 3-0 Atherton Laburnum Rovers
After ripping up my groundhopping calendar, mostly because I was determined to avoid overnight travel, and partly due to other commitments, there was a period of time where non-league football took a backseat.
But that period did not last long. Because of course it didn't.

Secretly, I'd loved travelling over ten hours back-and-forth to watch some 10th division football. And this was 9th division football in London.
When I had gone to East Dulwich exactly a week back, I had commented on how the amount of graffiti struck me as I watched from on board a southeastern train. I was going the exact same way, but much further this time - then I had stopped at Denmark Hill, now I would have to go six stations further. The graffiti I had thought was so emblematic of south London quickly disappeared, as did the tall buildings desperately cluttered together. We, and by we I mean me, were going to the suburbs. The stations be…

The story of a Dutch duo transferring to relegated Rayo - Dave van den Bergh and Robert Gehring (17th November, 2017)

Transfers are always fun.

While digging around former Rayo players, I found that someone had transferred from Rayo Vallecano to Rayo Majadahonda - the other Rayo.

What I uncovered was a fascinating story - the story of two Dutch friends who came together and left in very different ways...

Robert Gehring started his youth career in AFC, and finished it at Ajax; he made his debut in the first team in the second match for the 1995 UEFA Super Cup against Real Zaragoza - a competition Ajax subsequently won - but largely spent his time in the reserves. In the 1996-97 season, he got seriously injured, which stagnated his development.


In 1997 his friend and teammate Dave van den Bergh made the switch to Spanish side Rayo Vallecano. Dave recommended Gehring to the club, and Gehring was invited to a trail - despite the fact that his ACL injury had ruled him out for a year. In the trial, Gehring made such an impression that he was offered a contract.

Before Van den Bergh and Gehring joined the t…

Fuenlabrada - the mighty challengers: Part 2; aka Juan Quero - the roller-coaster (15th October, 2017)

In just a few months, Fuenlabrada have competed for promotion to the Segunda, signed a center-back from a La Liga side, and will now be playing Real Madrid in the Copa del Rey.

This is part 2 of a series about Fuenlabrada, the mighty challengers to Real Madrid, who they play in the cup on the 26th of October.

You can read part 1 here.



He was short. Very short. At 5'3", the left winger sometimes played in an over-sized shirt.

The ball never left his feet. His feet were tiny but they had magic. A dizzying array of body feints, close control, direction changes and sheer speed, often resembling a roller-coaster, left opposition defenders outwitted. And yes - sometimes, he frustrated. Sometimes, he was irregular.

But when he turned up, the world was at his feet.

If Juan Quero plays against Real Madrid he'll be playing against the club that let him go. The club that didn't think he had it in him to become a La Liga player.

The club that was wrong. Very, very wrong - he went fr…