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La perspectiva de Córdoba - with Adrián Fernández (18th July, 2017)

You can follow Adrián Fernández on Twitter here.

How long have you been a fan of Córdoba and what made you support them in the first place?

I've been a fan of Cordoba since I started to get interested in football, when I was a kid. The reason I follow the team is because it is from my city, and since I started to follow them, I felt very represented.

Describe your first experience of watching Córdoba play?

I do not remember the first time very well, because I was small, but I remember the relegation to the Segunda B (third division) in 2005. It hurt a lot, and it was at that moment when I felt that I loved Córdoba CF.

To an outsider - how would you describe Córdoba's playing style, what it means to be a fan of the club, and what it means to be a player of the club?

Córdoba has a very changing style of play. It depends on each rival. To be a player of Córdoba means not to surrender and fight until the end (we ascended to La Liga in the 93rd minute), and to be fan, the same thing. We never give up, and we follow our team unconditionally.

Describe the importance and significance of a game against an Andalusian team

The matches against Andalusian teams are always special. Our friend team is Recreativo de Huelva, and our rival, from my point of view, Granada. There are people who see as rivals to Sevilla or Betis, but Sevilla plays in Europe, and we face more often to Granada, that's why I consider him the rival of my team.

What do you think would be the key differences between a Córdoba and a fan from another club?

I think our pride sets us apart from the rest. We not only defend a team, but also a great and beautiful city like Córdoba, which we are very proud of and we presume when we wear the blanquiverde (white and green) shirt in other cities.

There was a time when Córdoba looked to have achieved the dream - a last minute goal and promotion to La Liga. However, the club is back in the Segunda, and in mid table. How would you describe the last few seasons for Córdoba fans?

I would describe them as seasons of disappointment, but also an illusion to relive the dream of La Liga. It took us 42 years to return to La Liga, but we think it will be much less time for our next promotion.

What is your opinion on the utilization of the youth teams? How would you rate the opportunities that youth players get in the first team?

I think the club is improving a lot in that aspect (two promotions of the filial team), but we have to continue working. There is still a long way to go until it is customary for the youth players to be headlines in the professional team.

List some things you appreciate and some things you can’t stand about the club management.

The positive thing about the management of the club is that today, we are a healthy club and we have gone from thinking about permanence to looking at promotion. On the contrary, the policy of the club with its fans seems to be very bad. Recently, the president called us customers!

The most famous ultra group at Córdoba is the Brigadas Blanquiverdes. How would you describe them and their political affiliations?

They have demonstrated loyalty to the club above all else. They are a group that I respect a lot, and I have been in their stand in many games. Politically, they have no affiliation, and each member has a different thought.

What is the feeling of fans of Córdoba and of other clubs towards them?

They are respected among the Córdoba fans, although it is true that they are also criticized by some sectors. Outside Córdoba, I have not seen much talk about them, except in specific cases, for example, Linares (friends) or Granada (enemies)

How would you characterize the Córdoba board's support to them?

I believe they have the right and necessary support :)

Any other notable ultras or fan groups that are worth mentioning?

Right now, none!

How would you contrast the "Córdoba fan experience" under Carlos González González and Alejandro González Muñoz?

Carlos González became the enemy of the fans on their own merits, and although Alejandro González tries to remedy them, he has the handicap of his father's management. In my opinion, I think the new president is doing some things well, but others do not.

Is there something that the media doesn't (or maybe doesn't want to) talk about about Córdoba that you think is worth mentioning?

Many things. We are not a club that fills pages in the newspapers, and I think they should mention many of the initiatives that fans have both in relation to the club and other external issues.

Your thoughts on the season ahead?

I am very excited about the new season. There have been many changes, and I like most of them. With hard work and effort, I think can do great things.

Anything I haven't covered and you'd like me to put in?

No, I can not think of anything else at the moment. I hope that in a few months, there are many beautiful stories to tell!




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